Genetic and Diagnostic Information to Define Disease Risk with Antinuclear Antibodies

Published by Luke Morais on

Genetic and Diagnostic Information to Define Disease Risk with Antinuclear Antibodies

 

What is Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)?

SLE is a complex disease in which the immune system attacks its own tissues. This causes widespread inflammation and can damage the body

There is no cure for SLE, but early medical treatment and lifestyle changes can help control it.

Doctors can test for SLE by checking for a certain type of antibody in the blood called antinuclear antibodies (ANA). Some people who don’t have SLE can also test positive for ANA. This can cause confusion for patients and doctors.

 

How was the study done?

The goal of this study is to see if a positive ANA test in people without autoimmune disease is related to certain conditions. In addition, the study will search for genetic factors that can help tell the difference between patients with SLE and those with a positive ANA without SLE. Our DNA (what makes up our genes) affects substances we produce in our bodies (like proteins). In this study, they will use the information from DNA to define which genes and proteins can help the diagnosis of SLE. They will also define who may develop severe disease. This could help with the development of new treatments for SLE.

 

What is the significance of this study?

Researchers will use information from DNA to define which proteins and genes are different for people with and without SLE. This could help doctors make an accurate and early diagnosis. Early diagnosis and treatment of SLE are important to improve the chances of getting better and to prevent organ damage. This research could also help find new ways to treat SLE by identifying genes and proteins that are involved in the disease.

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